Overview of London Exhibitions November 2015

London is rife with exciting galleries hosting exhibitions that showcase a wide range of works by British and international contemporary artists. Each diverse area of London has its own unique vibes, cultural programs and features. The aims of the tours that The Art Partners hold are not only to highlight well-known exhibitions, but to disclose captivating ones that are difficult to discover amongst the vast amount of upcoming shows.

Not so long ago in South London was opened Newport Street Gallery, design of which was made by Caruso St John architects known for Blain Southern Gallery and Tate Britain Millbank projects amongst others. It is currently showing late British artist John Hoyland’s abstract paintings in an inaugural exhibition entitled “John Hoyland: Power Stations - Paintings 1964-1982”. Hoyland’s geometric and gestural paintings fit beautifully into this inviting new space. Each room consists of a number of Hoyland’s intensely coloured works, providing a vibrant aesthetic against the monumental white walls.

Just a few minutes walk away from Newport Street Gallery is the recently renewed Gasworks Gallery, which houses not only exhibitions and outreach projects but also artists studios and programme of residencies. This autumn there is shown work of South African artist Kemand Wa Lehulere in an exhibition called “Sincerely yours”. This exhibition explores South Africa’s haunting past and how it is still affecting the present with references to overlooked historic figures. Wa Lehulere creates “living sculptures” out of soil and grass which are placed alongside mass-produced black and gold ceramic dogs. Visually stimulating black and white chalk boards are hung on the walls at juxtaposing angles, representing the excavation of Gladys Mgudlandlu’s paintings in Cape Town, where Wa Lehulere grew up. 

At the intimate IMT Gallery in East London, British sound artist Mark Peter Wright has curated the space with an exhibition called “I, the Thing in the Margins” which comments on the way in which humans interfere with non-human species and phenomena. The exhibition is centred around a life-size hairy monster who sits in a chair staring aimlessly into an amp which plays a disturbing monotone sound.

Close by is the Campoli Presti Gallery in which the Daniel Lefcourt exhibition “Anti-Scans” is currently on display. Lefcourt uses innovative 3D scanning techniques to create his impressive works, meaning the outcome is often unpredictable, thus making for dynamic and interesting artwork.

Another important art destination in East London is the Chisenhale Gallery, currently exhibiting the work of Berlin and Jerusalem based artist, Jumana Manna. The focus of this exhibition is a feature-length film, entitled “A magical substance flows into me”, which comments on the articulation of power through relationships such as that of a working class family in Jerusalem. The exhibition space is comfortable, providing you with blankets whilst you enjoy the visually pleasing art film.

    “I, the Thing in the Margins” by Mark Peter Wright at the IMT Gallery

“I, the Thing in the Margins” by Mark Peter Wright at the IMT Gallery

In West London, the Institute of Contemporary Arts is currently housing a different exhibition every week in their Fig. 2 space. This week is the 43rd show, Kilhberg & Henry’s 2015 film voiceover piece, “This Building, This Breath”. The room taken over by a seating area in front of a bright blue projected screen on which images and videos flash as one of the artists commentates. He explains how to breath accordingly whilst voicing content that coincides with the onscreen images. Late Show of American painter, Cy Twombly, is on at the West London Gagosian Gallery. Two rooms are filled with Twombly’s famously childlike sketches, sculptures and previously unseen Bacchus paintings. Most of the works on display came from the Twombly Foundation and various private collections, and only a few are for sale.

At the nearby Cortesi Gallery, Italian artist Grazia Varisco’s 1960s artwork is being shown. She was a part of Gruppo T, an important collective of kinetic art, which used things such as magnets in their work to make it interactive. The exhibition provides the viewer with an interesting array of Varisco’s geometric, colourful and typically 1960s works. Eastcastle Street in West London is home to many contemporary art galleries.

Pilar Corrias Gallery has a small exhibition by American artist Ian Cheng, entitled “Emissary Forks at Perfection”. The main focus of the exhibition is an experimental simulative film with an infinite duration that comments on humans interference on an ultimately Darwinian world.

Further down Eastcastle Street is the Carroll / Fletcher gallery. Here, Richard T. Wa has an exhibition called “Everything failing to become something”. The exhibition consists of carefully curated rooms filled with instruments and various images of rock forms, alongside eerie music which takes influence from 1980s and 1990s alternative and indie rock bands.

In November, when the buzz around Frieze and all of the other openings have cooled down, it's a great time to enjoy the shows across town and to discover fascinating new artists and creative places.

 

    “the predicament of always (as it is)” (2014) by Richard T. Walker, “everything failing to become something” exhibition, at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery

“the predicament of always (as it is)” (2014) by Richard T. Walker, “everything failing to become something” exhibition, at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery

    “momentarily together forever #1” and “momentarily together forever #2” (2014) by Richard T. Walker, “everything failing to become something” exhibition, at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery

“momentarily together forever #1” and “momentarily together forever #2” (2014) by Richard T. Walker, “everything failing to become something” exhibition, at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery

    “everything failing to become something”, Richard T. Walker at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery

“everything failing to become something”, Richard T. Walker at the Carroll / Fletcher Gallery