Art Weekly Digest: London 26 February - 04 March, 2018

Every week The Art Partners post a carefully curated selection of cultural events to see in London.

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 Francis Bacon,  Study for Portrait of Lucien Freud, 1964. Private Collection

Francis Bacon, Study for Portrait of Lucien Freud, 1964. Private Collection

I want the paint to work as flesh does.
— Lucian Freud. 2009

This sensuous new exhibition “All Too Human” is about to be opened at Tate Modern, bringing together some rarely seen works by such high-regarded artists as Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach and Paula Rego. All these artists have lived in Britain at some point of their life and tried to capture human body, their relationships and the tangible reality of life in the most sensuous way.The exhibition also shows how this spirit in painting was fostered by the previous generation, from Walter Sickert to David Bomberg, and how contemporary artists continue to express the tangible reality of life through paint.

This exhibition will be on view until Aug. 27 at the Tate Modern, Millbank, London, SW1P 4RG

 

In Focus

Michael Forbes

 Michael Forbes, Image Courtesy of the artist

Michael Forbes, Image Courtesy of the artist

Michael Forbes is an artist who was selected to paint a Millennium poster for the London Underground; he is also one of the favourite artists of Madonna, and his works are shown in the world-famous galleries next to the paintings of Warhol and Lichtenstein. This March, the Underdog Gallery London is delighted to present 25 original prints and paintings by this self-taught British pop surrealist artist. Come and enjoy his rather subconscious works, which often represent Michael’s playful thoughts and dreams.

This installation will be on view until March 18, at the Underdog Gallery; Arch 6, Crucifix Lane, London Bridge, SE1 3JW

 

Time To Book

Feminist Futures: moving image practices

 Zadie Xa,The Conch, Sea Urchin and Brass Bell, 2017. image courtesy of the artist

Zadie Xa,The Conch, Sea Urchin and Brass Bell, 2017. image courtesy of the artist

How can the language of moving image be used to destabilise conventional gender and racial positions in an attempt to reframe the boundaries of society? This talk, led by broadcaster, film-maker and journalist Bidisha brings together contemporary artists Sutapa Biswas, Jessy Jetpacks and Zadie Xa for analysing the importance of moving images in their art practise. The language of moving image will be discussed from different points of view and in different context such as emancipation, political struggle and contemporary feminism.

This workshop takes place on March 10 from 3 p.m. until 4:15 p.m. at the Reynolds Room, Burlington House, Royal Academy of Arts, W1J 0BD

 

Hymn For The Weekend

T-SHIRT: CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION

 Presentation of Christian Dior collection, Image credit Christian Dior

Presentation of Christian Dior collection, Image credit Christian Dior

The fashion tendencies come and go, yet the T-shirt - the most indispensable and affordable clothing item, is always the craze. The CULT – CULTURE – SUBVERSION exhibition at the Fashion and Textile museum explores its creation history, pick of popularity and the overthrow of the T-shirt. The central part of the installation features such rare objects as the T-shirts from Vivienne Westwood private collection from the early days until the most recent seasons.

The exhibition is on view until 6 May at the Fashion and Textile Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF

 

Last Chance To See

Industrial Melanism

 Neil Grayson, American Flag (industrial Melanism) © Courtesy of the artist and the gallery

Neil Grayson, American Flag (industrial Melanism) © Courtesy of the artist and the gallery

This is the last week when Eykyn Maclean Gallery would be hosting works of an American artist Neil Grayson. Based in New York City, he has always been fascinated by the relationship of the light and the darkness in paintings. Industrial Melanism generally refers to the change in color of the peppered moth – from white with black speckles to entirely black – during the Industrial Revolution, and remains one of the clearest examples in which the evolutionary process has been observed. Grayson has created his new series while searching for his own way to “cradle the light and hold the darkness”. His works (mostly oil and metals on canvas) contain dimensionality and movement, shining brightly and then falling dark.

The exhibition will be on view until March 3d, at the Eykyn Maclean, 24 Hanover Square, London, W1S 1JD