Art Weekly Digest: London 26 March - 01 April, 2018

Every week The Art Partners post a carefully curated selection of cultural events to see in London.

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  Image credit: Charles Albert Sholl

Image credit: Charles Albert Sholl

This provocative exhibition is very relevant considering recent events. “Hope to Nope: Graphics and Politics 2008-18,” opens its doors at the Design Museum this week. A collection of more than 160 works made with the use of graphic design such as posters, social media conversations, Internet memes and posters, reveals the importance of public participation in today’s political scene. Through these installations, visitors can explore powerful and sometimes shocking public reactions to major political and financial events.

The exhibition runs until August 12, at the Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, W8 6AG, London

 

 

In Focus

Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet

 Installation view of Afro Kismet exhibition by Fred Wilson at Pace Gallery

Installation view of Afro Kismet exhibition by Fred Wilson at Pace Gallery

Pace Gallery is hosting an exhibition of works by New York-born artist Fred Wilson. “Afro Kismet” features art works originally conceived for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in 2017, and includes globe sculptures, vitrine pieces, as well as two of Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, which are his special tools for meditation on blackness, death and beauty. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter – challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

The exhibition runs until April 27, at the Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

 

Time to book

Lidar as Visual Communication

 Max Colson, The Carpenter’s Estate, Stratford (2017) Image courtesy of the artist

Max Colson, The Carpenter’s Estate, Stratford (2017) Image courtesy of the artist

Max Colson, an award-winning artistic filmmaker, invites you to participate in his workshop, focusing on the exploration of the potential of Lidar 3D scanning technology. The artist uses this tool to tell stories and communicate visually. Join and explore the main effects of Lidar on our perception of time and space, as well as the critical concepts and qualities of this new visual communication technology.

This workshop takes place on Thursday, March 29, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the SPACE, 129–131 Mare Street, Hackney, London, E8 3RH

 

Hymn For The Weekend

DAMIEN HIRST: COLOUR SPACE PAINTINGS

 Paintings from Damien Hirst’s new Colour Space series are displayed in the State Rooms at Houghton Hall near King’s Lynn. Photo IMage: Pete Huggings/© DAMIEN HIRST AND SCIENCE LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2018

Paintings from Damien Hirst’s new Colour Space series are displayed in the State Rooms at Houghton Hall near King’s Lynn. Photo IMage: Pete Huggings/© DAMIEN HIRST AND SCIENCE LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2018

This spring one of Great Britain’s most celebrated artists, Damien Hirst, presents his art works at Houghton Hall, the lavish 18th century estate in Norfolk built for England’s first prime minister. The exhibition gathers Hirst’s iconic sculptures, as well as a new series of paintings, Colour Space. Never before exhibited, they developed from his famous Spot Paintings. Among the sculptures, visitors will find Hirst’s famous ‘Virgin Mother’ (2005–2006), and ‘Charity’ (2002–2003), which were previously displayed in major London squares.

The installation will be on view until July 15 at Houghton Hall, King’s Lynn, Norfolk, PE31 6UE

 

Last Chance To See

Peter Schuyff: Plato Combinato

 Installation View of Peter Schuyff exhibition at Carl Kostyal, image courtesy of the gallery

Installation View of Peter Schuyff exhibition at Carl Kostyal, image courtesy of the gallery

This is the last week to see the solo exhibition by Dutch-born artist Peter Schuyff, a member of the ‘Neo Geo’ movement. The Carl Kostyal Gallery has gathered some of the artist’s famous works made in geometric abstraction, including his watercolours from 1986 and three large-scale wooden sculptures from 2016. Schuyff’s reflective digital-influenced works are united by not claiming anything other than the item itself: “Some of my best abstract paintings were reduced to a clearly simple set of rules that I simply had to follow until the end; my paintings are about nothing. They deal with the problem of nothing,” says Schuyff.

The exhibition is on view until March 31, at the Carl Kostyál Gallery, 12a Savile Row, London, W1S 3PQ